The right way to drink Whisky

Across the world, people have been consuming Whisky for hundreds of years in about 2-3 different ways –  with ice, water or neat. There have been endless debates about the right way to consume Scotch. Over the years several Whisky based cocktails were also invented all claiming to be the right way to enjoy this sought after spirit. We are not sure that is the best way to savour such a fine spirit that is such a massive labour of love.

There is only one right way to drink Scotch. Neat.

drink-alcohol-cup-whiskey-51957

This is the right way to bring out the flavours for which you have spent a great deal of money to enjoy. Diluting and mixing only take away from the true essence of this liquid gold.

If however, this unadulterated way is not your favourite way to consume Whisky then we can suggest a splash of water.

On the rocks, a popular phrase usually used when ordering a drink of Whisky is not the most ideal way to consume Single Malts because adding ice will lead to the dulling of the flavour.

In recent times, it has been concluded that the addition of a little water to your Whisky is not a bad thing. Apparently, a chemical reaction occurs between the water and the tightly-wound chains of amino acids in the Whisky. They literally unravel, releasing new flavor compounds and esters (volatile compounds that smell like flowers and fruits).

How much water? We would recommend just a small splash.

Cheers!

 

History of the Cocktail

Every time you’re at a party, sipping a cool / colourful cocktail do you ever wonder about the first cocktail ever made?

Here’s one theory about the first cocktail.

In 1586, a fleet of English ships commanded by Sir Francis Drake was stranded near Havana. The ships were full of plundered gold but the crew were too sick to sail or fight.

According to the legend, Drake took local medicines such as mint (good for stomachs) lime (to treat scurvy), bark from the chuchuhuasi tree soaked in rum (a cure for dysentery), and cane sugar (to make it all taste OK), and mixed it all together. The resulting drink, dubbed El Draque, cured his sailors.

The word ‘cocktail’ comes into it because Drake’s crew allegedly drank this concoction from a long spoon with cock tail handle. Believe that? Well, it is just a theory. There is however a striking resemblance between the El Draque and the drink now known as the Mojito.

The other theory about the first cocktail came from the Americans.

America’s first cocktail, the Sazerac, was created in New Orleans in 1838, by Antoine Peychaud. He created the drink in a French Quarter bar and named it after his favourite French Brandy, Sazerac-de-Forge et fils. In 1873, the drink was changed when American Rye Whiskey was substituted for Cognac, and a dash of Absinthe was added by bartender Leon Lamothe, and today he is regarded as the Father of the Sazerac. In 1912, Absinthe was banned, so Peychaud substituted his special bitters in its place.

sazerac_cocktail

Sazerac Recipe:

  • 1 cube sugar
  • 1½ ounces (35ml) Sazerac Rye Whiskey or Buffalo Trace Bourbon
  • ¼ ounce Herbsaint
  • 3 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
  • Lemon peel

Pack an Old-Fashioned glass with ice. In a second Old-Fashioned glass place the sugar cube and add the Peychaud’s Bitters to it, then crush the sugar cube. Add the Sazerac Rye Whiskey or Buffalo Trace Bourbon to the second glass containing the Peychaud’s Bitters and sugar. Empty the ice from the first glass and coat the glass with the Herbsaint, then discard the remaining Herbsaint. Empty the Whiskey/bitters/sugar mixture from the second glass into the first glass and garnish with lemon peel.

Don’t forget to shop for your favourite drinks at our website.

Pairing Whisky with Food: 101

The cardinal rule for pairing Whisky with food is that you can’t mix and match as you please. Much like the broad spectrum of Wines that are paired with a wide variety of meats or cuisines, even Whisky can be paired with food based on how the flavours of the aforementioned complement each other.

This guide will take you beyond the Indian boundaries and flavours and into the old-school way of Whiskys paired around the world. This would give you a better idea of the range of flavours, thus making you a true connoisseur of Whisky. Right from the rich vanilla flavour found in American Bourbon Whiskey to the subtle smooth Irish Whisky to the not-so-subtle smokiness found in the finest Scotch, we give you a whiff of it all. This variation in flavours poses a challenge to pair food with Whiskey, especially due to the unlimited options. We have put together a list of some common foods that go with Whiskey and also recommend the kind of whiskies that go with it.

  • Meat

_DSC0172

Image Source: http://bit.ly/1NzYlcI

One of the oldest tricks in the book is to drink an American Whiskey with barbecued foods or pulled meats such as beef or pork. This blends in with the intense aroma of such meats and the well-marinated flavours of barbecued meat. Jack Daniel’s Whiskey http://goo.gl/5uZrQJ and Jim Beam’s Bourbon http://goo.gl/V7gDDp make a good pairing with barbecued meat.

Lighter meats go best with Irish Whiskys such as Jameson Irish Whiskey http://goo.gl/EXbPts due to the similar vibrance they share. Irish Whiskey, typically offers a spicy freshness which makes up for the lack of strong flavouring of white meats that are grilled.

Richer Scotch blends like Johnnie Walker http://goo.gl/wdeYn0 are ideal for pairing with main dishes which are heavy on flavours like curries or steaks.

  1. Seafood

sushi

Image source: http://bit.ly/1FMCz2Y

The delicate and sweetish tinge that is found in seafood, make it a great pairing with Single Casks that carry similar traces of sweetness. Glenlivet Single Cask http://goo.gl/5qON9N  is a great combination with scallops or even crabs.

A very interesting supplement with Sushi is a Japanese Single Malt Whiskey called Yamazaki. This Whiskey carries an intense sweet aroma and washes down the soft and creamy texture of Sushi.

Lighter Whiskys are recommended with seafood as they complement the sweet undertone and enhance the flavors of each other.

  1. Cheese

cheese assortment on a cutting board

Image source: http://bit.ly/1OXzwuu

A  great accompaniment for cheese is Irish Whisky, the spicy flavour of the Whisky goes well with the pungency of cheese and balances out the sharp taste.

Even Single-Malt varieties like Johnnie Walker Black Label http://goo.gl/koVLWe  has a smoky yet intense aroma to it and is perfect with well-aged cheddar cheese.

  1.    Chocolate and dessert

orange-chocolate-pudding-recipe

Image Source: http://bit.ly/1Msm9lJ

The Peated Malt has an amazing smoky flavour which is an acquired taste and let us warn you, it’s not meant for everyone. However, the upside of drinking this Whiskey is that it makes for a perfect match with dark chocolates.

Even lighter Scotch blends like J&B http://goo.gl/ZHnyX2 can be drank with a fruity dessert as they carry complex flavours with a pleasant and smooth aftertaste.

Bourbon Whiskeys provide just the right amount of sweet hints to go with a pecan pie or cheesecakes.

Desserts with meringues or a citrusy tinge go perfectly with Grained Whiskeys that augment the sweetness of the flavours.

It is quite an art to pair food with Whisky and if done right, you could establish that you know your Whiskies as well as you know your food. So stick to these very simple basics of Whisky pairing with food and also have a look at our collection of Whiskies and Single-malts before you get cracking on this guide: http://goo.gl/fCgQV4 http://goo.gl/bo0a4m

Jack Daniel’s Black – The best of Tennessee Whiskey

When you say or hear the words Jack Daniel’s, the first thing that comes to mind is sophistication and class. You hear elegance, master-class, perfection and so much more than just the word Whiskey. And when you hear the name Jack Daniel’s Black you know it has to be something more special.

Jack Daniel's Black

Image source:http://www.jackdaniels.com/verify-age?url=whiskey/jack-daniels-old-no-7

This classic wonder is also called ‘Old No.7’ and is one of the bestselling spirits in the world. It is made in the Tennessee sour mash style, with an additional step where the fresh spirit is dipped in a vat of sugar maple charcoal to mellow the Whiskey before it goes into the barrel. As a result of this, the spirit is smooth and versatile and at the same time stays true to its country roots.

This spirit has gentle aromas of caramel vanilla and butterscotch. It has a quick, sweet finish with oak notes and hints of spices, which give way to the flavours of white pepper and walnuts.

There’s no better combination than the classic Jack and Coke.

Jack and Coke

Image source: http://www.jackdaniels.com/verify-age?url=recipes

Use:

1 part Jack Daniel’s Black Old No. 7
3 parts Coke

Serve over ice in a tall glass. Garnish with a slice of lime.

This simple cocktail is the best way to enjoy this fantastic Whiskey with a tangy twist. Only after you taste this masterpiece will you realise why this is one of the top selling Whiskies in the world.

On your next international trip via Kempegowda International Airport, visit Bengaluru Duty Free and pick up a bottle of this classic at a fabulous discount.